Please Don’t Climb Uluru

100 years of history summed up in a single paragraph: the Anangu people are the traditional – and current – owners of Uluru and the land around it. Tourists have climbed Uluru since the 1930s, and for numerous reasons both cultural and practical the Anangu have never liked it. Due to an agreement with the parks authority they didn’t ban it outright but chose instead to appeal to peoples’ better nature with a polite sign. In 2010 the park authority agreed to “phase out the climb” which was finally done on October 26th 2019[1]Parks Australia, Uluru climb closure (Web page) <https://parksaustralia.gov.au/uluru/discover/culture/uluru-climb/>. Shortly before the climb was banned hoardes of people flocked to Uluru in the Northern Territory’s biggest tourism year ever.

"Please don't climb Uluru"

This is one of those rare (for me at least) occasions where I made a photo. I had this image in mind sitting at home in Warrnambool. I had this picture in mind on the 9 day drive it took to get to Uluru. I had this image in mind as I lay sleepless in my swag the night before. I had this in mind as I pressed the shutter button.

"Please don't climb Uluru"

This is one of the usual fare: as I was leaving, I turned for one last look and snapped this sitting in the driver’s seat of my car. Most of my good images are luck, and this one I consider winning the lottery. 

References

References
1 Parks Australia, Uluru climb closure (Web page) <https://parksaustralia.gov.au/uluru/discover/culture/uluru-climb/>
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